Wind Back Q&A

Posted by PBS Online Film Festival Editor on

Editor’s Note: The opinions expressed in this blog post are solely those of the respondents.

Director Andrea Carrino reveals how a simple request from his mother inspired him to create his film "Wind Back."

PBS: What was the inspiration behind the plot for this film?

Andrea Carrino: I had the seed of the idea one night after I came back from the cinema. I entered my house, there was total silence, all the lights were off and everyone was sleeping. While I was going to sleep I suddenly heard the voice of my mom; she was calling me, asking to turn on the washing machine, and I replied through her room door, which was closed. Immediately after that, the concept popped up into my head: a boy who comes home to talk to his mother through a sealed door.

PBS: The story itself revolves around the voice of the main character’s mother, who he only hears from behind a closed door his entire life. Yet during the film we don’t hear much dialogue between the characters. Can you take us behind the creative direction for this?

Andrea: From the early stages of developing the story my intention was always to tell a story just with images and music, so I tried to strip away as much dialogue as possible. I think now, looking back, this was the right decision because to have dialogue in the central part [of the film] was unnecessary. After you see the good morning scene and the relationship they have, you don’t need to know what they are saying - at least for me.

"From the early stages of developing the story my intention was always to tell a story just with images and music, so I tried to strip away as much dialogue as possible." 

PBS: In the end, the character learns that the voice behind the closed door was audio recording of his mother before she died. When he discovers this, he shuts the machine down, but much later in his life he returns to her. What is the significance of this moment, and why did you want it to end with him turning the recording back on?

Andrea: [This is] a very good question, but I’m not quite sure if I have a good answer for it. What I can say for sure is that a lot of things changed during the story development but one thing always stayed there: the final image of [the main character] at the end of his life sitting on the floor like when he was a child. So I asked myself, “How did he get there?” I found that he had to turn the machine back on very quickly, but what really was important to me was the action of closing the door again, wishing he hadn’t ever opened [it].

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